Recommend a book...

Postby Guest on Sun Aug 28, 2005 5:52 pm

if you like John Irving novels, you may like The Shipping News by E Annie Proule. It had a similar feel to Irving's books, which I love. thoroughly enjoyed it.
Just read The Time Traveller's Wife by Audrey Niffenegger, the dates and ages need to be followed carefully so you don't get lost in the plot, but it's beautifully written, very moving.

The Wrong Boy-Willie Rushton
Written on the Body-Jeannette Winterson
A Suitable Boy-Vikram Seth
Midnight's Children-Salman Rushdie
Nick Hornby-A Long Way Down
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Postby Tom Foolery on Sun Aug 28, 2005 6:13 pm

i read the 'cloughie' biography last year. he died a week later. :shock:
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Re: Recommend a book...

Postby AllyD on Sun Aug 28, 2005 7:14 pm

Sparkly Diamond wrote:There's been shitloads of idolisation and demonisation of films on here of late.

Seems that there are a lot of people who go to watch films out of habit and tell other people how bad the films were afterwards - presumably because they're crap

For example:
Sparkly Diamond wrote:Still haven't seen A Shot At Glory.

Maybe just as well - Escape To Victory makes me greet!


I really like The Rum Diary. It's slim and many Hunter S. Thompson fans don't like it next to his mightier tomes but it's the only of his and I devoured every page like his protagonist devours, er rum.

I loved Davis Miller's Tao of 'Muhammad Ali' a biography that's also an autobiog of the author. You can smell the boxing ring.
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Postby Sparkly Diamond on Sun Aug 28, 2005 8:06 pm

Sparkly Diamond wrote:
There's been shitloads of idolisation and demonisation of films on here of late.

Seems that there are a lot of people who go to watch films out of habit and tell other people how bad the films were afterwards - presumably because they're crap

For example:
Sparkly Diamond wrote:

Still haven't seen A Shot At Glory.

Maybe just as well - Escape To Victory makes me greet!


Your point being...?
I fear the worst.
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Postby Clancy on Sun Aug 28, 2005 8:28 pm

God, people have such diverse tastes! There are a lot of books on this thread that have been on my 'To Do' list for years. Hopefully I'll get round to them eventually. Could I add to the list:

Alice In Wonderland (possibly my fave book ever)
The Blind Watchmaker - Richard Dawkins
Billy Liar - Keith Waterhouse
Das Boot - Lothar-Gunther Buccheim
A Widow For One Year - John Irving
The Machinery Of Freedom - David Friedman
The Road To Serfdom - FA Hayek
Should have been a 6-iron.
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Postby Pissed off on Sun Aug 28, 2005 9:24 pm

Fuck it
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Postby trixie3 on Sun Aug 28, 2005 9:52 pm

coastal wrote:I think Lanark is a book you either love or hate. I've had some really strange looks from people when I've raved about it. I know quite a few people who just couldn't get into it and had to give up after the first few chapters.


i'm afraid i'm one of the people who gave up after a couple of chapters. i really wanted to read it but it just wasn't getting anywhere

john wrote:trixie3 wrote:
'naive. super' - erland loe (simple, endearing, beautiful and unaffected. as pure as fiction can get)

didn't know he wrote books as well as songs - will have to check this out...I'm presuming this is the guy from The Kings of Convenience?


not sure. the biog at the front of the book says he works on sage, film and video production, has been a critic for the Worker's Newspaper (Norway) and worked in a psychiatric hospital. Is this the same guy?

And I agree with you on Douglas Coupland - I love them all. A word of warning though: If you ever go to a book signing, don't ask about his depression when he was writing Life After God! I severely regret it; should just have asked who his favourite author was, like everyone else :oops:
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Postby trixie3 on Sun Aug 28, 2005 10:21 pm

Sparkly Diamond wrote:Jeezo, troops, there's some great tips there but it's going to cost me a fortune.

Ebay's for a pummeling, I reckon.


Take a look at http://www.greenmetropolis.com All books are £3.75 with free P+P on standard paperbacks. You can sell unwanted books there too and get £3 for each book sold.
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Postby Sparkly Diamond on Sun Aug 28, 2005 10:30 pm

Thanks for the tip.

I shouldn't really, I've got a mountain of books waiting to get read. But I probably will anyway.
I fear the worst.
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Postby john on Sun Aug 28, 2005 10:30 pm

trixie3 wrote:not sure. the biog at the front of the book says he works on sage, film and video production, has been a critic for the Worker's Newspaper (Norway) and worked in a psychiatric hospital. Is this the same guy?


think i've the wrong erland - i'm thinking of erland oye

And I agree with you on Douglas Coupland - I love them all. A word of warning though: If you ever go to a book signing, don't ask about his depression when he was writing Life After God! I severely regret it; should just have asked who his favourite author was, like everyone else :oops:


He did the book festival in edinburgh a few years ago but was at best uncommunicative and worst down right rude to a bunch of people. I find the whole 'book tour' thing quite artificial anyway - the guy is obviously a bit of a loner but becasue it sells morecopies he's forced by his publishers to do the meet and greets...doesn't detract from the quality of the books at all...
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Postby Wiggy on Mon Aug 29, 2005 10:20 am

Currently reading "My Fault" by Billy Childish - good so far (and the guy's dyslexic too!). Always thought of him as a real punk/garage treasure - love The Milkshakes, Headcoats, Buff Medways, so it's interesting to read a bit about his life.
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Postby singloud_singproud on Mon Aug 29, 2005 12:50 pm

Wiggy wrote:Currently reading "My Fault" by Billy Childish - good so far (and the guy's dyslexic too!). Always thought of him as a real punk/garage treasure - love The Milkshakes, Headcoats, Buff Medways, so it's interesting to read a bit about his life.


Sounds like an interesting read, didnt know there was a book about him. Is there any mention of the band 'The Singing Loins' in there? Crackin' band, well worth checking out!
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Postby Guest on Mon Aug 29, 2005 1:05 pm

singloud_singproud wrote:
Wiggy wrote:Currently reading "My Fault" by Billy Childish - good so far (and the guy's dyslexic too!). Always thought of him as a real punk/garage treasure - love The Milkshakes, Headcoats, Buff Medways, so it's interesting to read a bit about his life.


Sounds like an interesting read, didnt know there was a book about him. Is there any mention of the band 'The Singing Loins' in there? Crackin' band, well worth checking out!


Haven't come across that yet. It's a good read once you get used to his style.
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Postby Guest on Mon Aug 29, 2005 1:06 pm

Anonymous wrote:
singloud_singproud wrote:
Wiggy wrote:Currently reading "My Fault" by Billy Childish - good so far (and the guy's dyslexic too!). Always thought of him as a real punk/garage treasure - love The Milkshakes, Headcoats, Buff Medways, so it's interesting to read a bit about his life.


Sounds like an interesting read, didnt know there was a book about him. Is there any mention of the band 'The Singing Loins' in there? Crackin' band, well worth checking out!


Haven't come across that yet. It's a good read once you get used to his style.

That was me, Wiggy. Forgot to log in.
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Postby tartrazine on Mon Aug 29, 2005 4:35 pm

Sparkly Diamond wrote:Anyone read any Martin Millar? He's a Scot but most of his work is set in or around Brixton. Very easy to read but with very sad, profound passages - and he's handy with the humour too.

I'd recommend The Good Fairies of New York as a starter. Two thistle fairies get chased out of Scotland for playing Ramones tunes on their fiddles, puking on the Fairy Flag of Dunvegan and generally being too punky for the clans and wake up in America with massive hangovers. You know, the same old story.

Anyhow, brilliant book.


I love Martin Millar a lot. The Good Fairies of New York is almost impossible to get hold of now, unless you don't mind stupid ebay prices, but his last one, Suzy, Led Zeppelin and Me would make an equally good starter if you've not read any of his stuff before.

Other than him, last good fiction I read was "We Need To Talk About Kevin" by Lionel "No, actually, Lionel's a perfectly normal name for a woman" Shriver. Wouldn't recommend it for new parents though! Has anyone mentioned Julian Cope's Head On/Repossessed yet?
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