Recommend a book...

Postby singloud_singproud on Fri Aug 26, 2005 8:27 pm

geomck wrote:Anything by Raymond Chandler.

Michael Moorcock - The "Von Bek" series, The "Elric" series and the Jerry Cornelius novels.

Flann O'Brien - The Third Policeman and The Dalkey Arkives.


Flann O'Briens books are a crackin read! Specially 'The Third Policeman'...srange but good all the same
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Postby trixie3 on Fri Aug 26, 2005 9:17 pm

singloud_singproud wrote:
geomck wrote:Anything by Raymond Chandler.

Michael Moorcock - The "Von Bek" series, The "Elric" series and the Jerry Cornelius novels.

Flann O'Brien - The Third Policeman and The Dalkey Arkives.


Flann O'Briens books are a crackin read! Specially 'The Third Policeman'...srange but good all the same


Definitely. Flann O'Brien (also goes under the name Myles na Gopleen) is very strange and very funny. The Poor Mouth is another of his classics.
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Postby john on Fri Aug 26, 2005 11:00 pm

trixie3 wrote:'naive. super' - erland loe (simple, endearing, beautiful and unaffected. as pure as fiction can get)


didn't know he wrote books as well as songs - will have to check this out...I'm presuming this is the guy from The Kings of Convenience?

i'm not sure about danny wallace - i find him only about half as funny as dave gorman. 'the yes man' just tries too hard for my liking ...


I don't find the writing all that funny but the nature of the 'stupid boy projects' really grabs me - I love the spontaneity and overalls stupidness of it.

I thought he was the funnier of the two though I've heard Googlewhack is very funny....

Kurt Vonnegut is the man as is Kerouac - some good books popping up int his thread....so I hate to bring the tone down by mentioning my current tome - Porno - Irvine Welsh's follow up to Trainspotting. Not far enough into it to make a judgement yet but enjoying it so far....
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Postby saint jMAC on Sat Aug 27, 2005 12:31 am

The Peoples Act of Love - James Meek (current read).
Patches of Fire - Albert French
The Miracle Life of Edgar Mint - Brady Udahl
The Ice At The Bottom Of The World - Mark Richard (short stories)
All Quiet On The Western Front - Remarque
Anything by Milan Kundera
Any of Bukowskis novels
My Dark Places - James Ellroy
Cloud Atlas - David Mitchell
Middlesex - Jeffrey Eugenides

If you want more, I'll give you more. I love to read. I collect first edition books. Duglas T Stewart will find this very funny now.
Over and out, joe.
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Postby Stew on Sat Aug 27, 2005 11:06 am

Is Cloud Atlas good? It's cheap in Fopp and a lot of people have been talking about it.

*update* I'm intrigued. Sounds like it could be audaciously brilliant or an audacious failure!

Amazon.co.uk Review
It's hard not to become ensnared by words beginning with the letter B, when attempting to describe Cloud Atlas, David Mitchell's third novel. It's a big book, for start, bold in scope and execution--a bravura literary performance, possibly. (Let's steer clear of breathtaking for now.) Then, of course, Mitchell was among Granta's Best of Young British Novelists and his second novel number9dreamwas shortlisted for the Booker Prize. Characters with birthmarks in the shape of comets are a motif; as are boats. Oh and one of the six narratives strands of the book--where coincidentally Robert Frobisher, a young composer, dreams up "a sextet for overlapping soloists" entitled Cloud Atlas--is set in Belgium, not far from Bruges. (See what I mean?)

Structured rather akin to a Chinese puzzle or a set of Matrioshka dolls, there are dazzling shifts in genre and voice and the stories leak into each other with incidents and people being passed on like batons in a relay race. The 19th-century journals of an American notary in the Pacific that open the novel are subsequently unearthed 80 years later on by Frobisher in the library of the ageing, syphilitic maestro he's trying to fleece. Frobisher's waspish letters to his old Cambridge crony, Rufus Sexsmith, in turn surface when Rufus, (by the 1970s a leading nuclear scientist) is murdered. A novelistic account of the journalist Luisa Rey's investigation into Rufus' death finds its way to Timothy Cavendish, a London vanity publisher with an author who has an ingenious method of silencing a snide reviewer. And in a near-dystopian Blade Runner-esque future, a genetically engineered fast food waitress sees a movie based on Cavendish's unfortunate internment in a Hull retirement home. (Cavendish himself wonders how a director called Lars might wish to tackle his plight). All this is less tricky than it sounds, only the lone "Zachary" chapter, told in Pacific Islander dialect (all "dingos'n'ravens", "brekker" and "f'llowin'"s) is an exercise in style too far. Not all the threads quite connect but nonetheless Mitchell binds them into a quite spellbinding rumination on human nature, power, oppression, race, colonialism and consumerism. --Travis Elborough --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.
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Postby Sonia on Sat Aug 27, 2005 7:16 pm

The only books I seem to have time for nowadays are "graphic novels." I just finished this one:

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and am starting on this one:

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Postby coastal on Sat Aug 27, 2005 8:12 pm

Stew wrote:Lanark by Alisdair Gray is the greatest Glasgow novel evah! Fuck it, it's probably my favourite Scottish book ever, topping even Miss Jean Brodie, Justified Sinner and Lanark.


I think Lanark is a book you either love or hate. I've had some really strange looks from people when I've raved about it. I know quite a few people who just couldn't get into it and had to give up after the first few chapters.
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Postby iFan on Sat Aug 27, 2005 9:05 pm

i'd recommend.....

prick up your ears - john lahr
the lives of john lennon - albert goldman
girlfriend in a coma - douglas coupland
a confederacy of dunces - john kennedy o toole
meat is murder - joe pernice
the peculiar memories of thomas penman - bruce robinson
christie malry's own double entry - b s johnson
in cold blood - truman capote
my magpie eyes are hungry for the prize - david cavanagh
revolution in the head - ian macdonald
please kill me - legs mcneil & gillian mccain
the chronicles of narnia - c s lewis
bad wisdom - bill drummond & mark manning
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Postby Stew on Sat Aug 27, 2005 10:03 pm

Heh, I know what you mean about Lanark. Half the people on my Eng lit course turned their noses up at it. But if you're not willing to stick with it then what are going to be like when you come across something REALLY difficult like Sound & The Fury (a masterpiece once you realise what's going on and how masterly Faulkner's use of voices is) or Ulysses. Anyway, it's worth sticking with the weird stuff. There are some people who say they like the realist half of the book but not the dystopian sci-fi stuff, but they complement each other beautifully. The way he captures Glasgow as he's growing up is amazing and then to reimagine it into the future is inspired. It's a big book and gives you so much to play with, what with all the narrative tricks and jokes (like the bit where God talks to the author and the index of plagiarisms) are wonderful and great fun to pick apart. I absolutely loved it - one of these books that has a huge effect on you. Think I might reread it at some point, it's been four years!
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Postby coastal on Sat Aug 27, 2005 10:18 pm

Last time I read it was about 4 or 5 years ago – before someone borrowed my copy and never gave it back. :evil:
I don’t even think she liked it, so has probably binned it by now. :cry:
I keep talking about replacing it, but haven’t got round to it as yet.
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Postby Stew on Sat Aug 27, 2005 10:28 pm

Gotta replace it dude, a house in not a home unless it's got a copy of Lanark!
Now that I mention it my copy is still at my mum's! But then so are 2/3 of my albums and books! Gradually moving them through - no car to humph them in one.
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Postby Sparkly Diamond on Sat Aug 27, 2005 10:30 pm

Jeezo, troops, there's some great tips there but it's going to cost me a fortune.

Ebay's for a pummeling, I reckon.

It's good to hear Flann O'Brien getting a mention. An author I'd always meant find out about at some stage - I remember MacGowan banging on about At Swim Two Birds and it stuck - but never got round to it. I'll get that sorted soon enough.

Kurt Vonnegut's another that I'm ashamed to admit that I've read none of. Yet.

Anyone read any Martin Millar? He's a Scot but most of his work is set in or around Brixton. Very easy to read but with very sad, profound passages - and he's handy with the humour too.

I'd recommend The Good Fairies of New York as a starter. Two thistle fairies get chased out of Scotland for playing Ramones tunes on their fiddles, puking on the Fairy Flag of Dunvegan and generally being too punky for the clans and wake up in America with massive hangovers. You know, the same old story.

Anyhow, brilliant book.
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Postby john on Sat Aug 27, 2005 10:59 pm

iFan wrote:girlfriend in a coma - douglas coupland


and everything else by Doug Coupland - the man is a genius...
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Postby iFan on Sat Aug 27, 2005 11:08 pm

john wrote:
iFan wrote:girlfriend in a coma - douglas coupland


and everything else by Doug Coupland - the man is a genius...


i read that book when i was on a bit of a downer and it fitted my mood perfectly somehow.

it's the only book of his i've read. what do you recommend next john? :)
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Postby john on Sat Aug 27, 2005 11:16 pm

iFan wrote:
john wrote:
iFan wrote:girlfriend in a coma - douglas coupland


and everything else by Doug Coupland - the man is a genius...


i read that book when i was on a bit of a downer and it fitted my mood perfectly somehow.

it's the only book of his i've read. what do you recommend next john? :)


mate, like children, I love them all equally. Generation X was the first I read so probably shades it as my favourite. The new one Eleanor Rigby is probably the best piece of fiction he's written...I'm no real critical judge as everything he write hits the mark...
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